The Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation Agency (ATA) is part of the Government of Ethiopia and reports to an Agricultural Transformation Council chaired by the Prime Minister. The ATA is tasked with supporting all key stakeholders to transform the country’s agriculture sector so that Ethiopia achieves its national target: reaching middle-income status by 2025.

By Hilda Mhagama |

AS one way to boost yields and improve value chains, other African countries need to learn from Ethiopia by establishing Agricultural Transformation Agency (ATA) in their localities which will work as multi- stakeholder approach to identify and prioritize the main drivers of agricultural change.

By taking such an approach, countries may not only uphold the growth rates in the agricultural sector, but as a matter of fact hasten them to double digit levels in the coming decade. Ethiopian Minister for Agriculture, Mr Tefera Derbrew, said the approach involves prioritizing those activities that have the greatest potential to transform the agriculture sector, investing the necessary resources into these interventions and engaging all key stakeholders to execute them effectively.

“The ministry of agriculture is positive that the deliverables in the transformation agenda coordinated and supported by a dedicated body ATA will substantially boost agricultural growth and catalyze the transformation of the sector,” he said.

He added, “They believe that agriculture can serve as a major pillar for Ethiopia’s economic development in the years to come.” The Ethiopian population is close to 100 million people, which is spread over an area of more than a million square kilometers that ranges from semi-desert to swamps to mountain ranges and fertile farmland. The weather systems and agricultural patterns are diverse and complex.

Speaking about climate change in Ethiopia, the Country Representative for Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in Ethiopia, Mr Haddis Tadesse, said the country has experienced the calamity for a very long time.

“We have tried to create an early warning system to help farmers cope with the situation and teaching them ways technology can help them lessen climate change damage,” said Mr Tadesse.

Source: Daily News | The National Newspaper
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