The nationwide mapping effort was launched by the Ethiopian Soil Information System (EthioSIS) in 2012, and is due to be completed this year.

By Pius Sawa (Thomson Reuters Foundation) |

A comprehensive digital map charting soil fertility in Ethiopia is proving an important tool in tackling the country’s low farm productivity, a challenge made more acute by climate change.

The nationwide mapping effort was launched by the Ethiopian Soil Information System (EthioSIS) in 2012, and is due to be completed this year.

The project in the Horn of Africa nation is already achieving results, with new fertilizer combinations boosting wheat yields from around 1 ton to 3 tons per hectare (about 2-1/2 acres) on more than 40 percent of its agricultural land last year.

Tekalign Mamo, program leader for EthioSIS, said fertility and other soil characteristics are dynamic processes that must be well understood for a country to be able to feed its population.

“Through the years, the soil fertility status of Ethiopia – similar to other African countries – has deteriorated, and (it) has faced severe nutrient depletion and land degradation,” he explained.

ALSO READ Professor Tekalign Mamo, of Haramaya University, Wins the 2016 IFA Norman Borlaug Award

“Due to human activities like deforestation, we have experienced changing rain patterns, resulting in effects like flooding and soil erosion,” he said.

Agricultural land is damaged by soil acidity, salinity and erosion, which are mainly man-made problems that have seen productivity stagnate, he said.

Ethiopia’s average cereal yield is little more than 2 tons per hectare, which is very low compared to international standards, Mamo noted.

Continue reading this story on The Christian Science Monitor
——
See also:


Download Sodere app and watch new full movies for free  የሶደሬ አፕልኬሽንን በማውረድ አዳዲስ ፊልሞች  በነፃ  ተመልከቱ 

Choose your platform iPhone   Android   Roku   Apple TV

                  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.