At this stage the grounds for the Ethiopian Human Rights Commission’s conclusion are unclear, since no written report has yet been published.

By Felix Horne (Addis Standard) |

In February 2016, an 18-year-old student who I will call Tolessa and two friends took part in their first protest, in Oromia’s East Hararghe zone. As the crowd moved forward, they were met by a line of regional police, federal police and the army. Shortly thereafter and without warning, security forces fired live ammunition into the crowd hitting Tolessa four times. Miraculously he survived. But his two friends were not so lucky.

I first interviewed him in April 2016 for the Human Rights Watch June 2016 report on abuses during the first six months of the Oromo protests. Several days ago, Tolessa got in touch with me again to update me on his condition.

I spoke to him around the time that Ethiopia’s national Human Rights Commission submitted an oral report to parliament on the protests. This was the Commission’s second report to parliament, covering the protests between June and September in parts of Oromia, Amhara, and SNNPR regions. The Commission found that 669 people were killed, including 63 members of the security forces, and concluded—once again–that security forces had taken “proportionate measures in most areas.”

While many will focus on the death toll, the commission’s conclusion that the use of force was mostly proportionate and appropriate is in stark contrast to the descriptions of victims like Tolessa, and at odds with the findings of other independent investigators. At this stage the grounds for the commission’s conclusion are unclear, since no written report has yet been published.

Continue reading this story on Addis Standard
——
See also:


Download Sodere app and watch new full movies for free  የሶደሬ አፕልኬሽንን በማውረድ አዳዲስ ፊልሞች  በነፃ  ተመልከቱ 

Choose your platform iPhone   Android   Roku   Apple TV

                  

One Response

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.