At the center of a serving of doro wat sits a glistening, crimson egg, like the beating heart of a nation’s cuisine, a symbol of love born and reborn.

By Dominic Armato (The Republic) |

Cafe Lalibela in Tempe is a teeming trove of sultry scents, a mix of toasted chiles, cinnamon, cardamom and coffee swirling around platters of meats and vegetables that look like a desert landscape, carefully mounded into miniature dunes. But while the varied dishes can be ordered a la carte, it’s difficult to find a table that hasn’t ordered doro wat, Ethiopia’s rich and intense chicken stew.

As culinary metaphors go, this one writes itself.

Ethiopian dish Doro Wat: Wait, excuse me, Doro what?

At the center of a serving of doro wat sits a glistening, crimson egg, like the beating heart of a nation’s cuisine, a symbol of love born and reborn.

That it’s fabulously delicious seems almost incidental given the dish’s inherent poetry. But when it comes to evoking passion, it’s difficult to top the fiery intensity of doro wat, prepared with pride and widely considered the national dish of Ethiopia.

From Ethiopia to Arizona

Atsade Desta first shared the flavors of her native Ethiopia with the Valley in 1996, when she opened the original Cafe Lalibela in Phoenix. Soon thereafter, she moved the business to Tempe, where it has stood as a community touchstone for two decades, run by Desta along with her daughter and son-in-law, Salem and Anibal Beyene.

Continue reading this story at The Republic/ AZCentral
——
See also:


Download Sodere app and watch new full movies for free  የሶደሬ አፕልኬሽንን በማውረድ አዳዲስ ፊልሞች  በነፃ  ተመልከቱ 

Choose your platform iPhone   Android   Roku   Apple TV

                  

2 Responses

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.