For Meskerem, Hanukkah traditions include candle lighting with tofe as well as the doro wat, “chicken with sauce” in Amharic, a dish eaten by all Ethiopians.

By Joan Nathan (The New York Times) |

SOUTHFIELD, Mich.―For Meskerem Gebreyohannes, all of the Jewish holidays bring doro wat, a luxurious chicken dish she makes with slowly cooked onions and a red chile sauce layered with flavors from the African spice trail.

Despite growing up in a Jewish family in Harar, a city in Ethiopia a few hours by car from Somalia, she never celebrated “modern” holidays like Hanukkah.

Mrs. Gebreyohannes, 58, is the chef and an owner, with her husband, Kassa, of Taste of Ethiopia, a small restaurant in Southfield, Mich. She is like many other Jewish immigrants from Ethiopia, who did not learn the story of the Maccabees defeating the Greeks. It appears in the oral Torah that was written down around A.D. 200, a time when much of the world was unaware of the existence of a Jewish community in Ethiopia.

Separated from Israel and the Diaspora for more than 2,000 years, Ethiopian Jews followed the Old Testament, which does not include the Hanukkah story, as a source for holiday customs. Mrs. Gebreyohannes fled Ethiopia in 1981 as a refugee to Djibouti, then went to Canada in 1982, where she started observing the custom of lighting a menorah for eight days. She settled in Michigan in 2004.

Now, her Hanukkah traditions include candle lighting with tofe (a homemade Ethiopian beeswax candle with a big flame) as well as the doro wat, “chicken with sauce” in Amharic, a dish eaten by all Ethiopians. For her celebrations, Mrs. Gebreyohannes serves it with dabo, a holiday bread made with flour, or injera, the daily bread made of teff.

“In Ethiopia, we were always surrounded by cooking,” she said earlier this fall, while pulverizing the onions and garlic for her doro wat.

Ms. Gebreyohannes uses oil rather than the more traditional ghee used in the dish. Bright red berbere — she uses a chile spice mix from Ethiopia that includes cardamom, ginger, fenugreek and thyme — lends more than color to the sauce.

Continue reading “A New African Tradition for Hanukkah” at The New York Times
——
See also:


Download Sodere app and watch new full movies for free  የሶደሬ አፕልኬሽንን በማውረድ አዳዲስ ፊልሞች  በነፃ  ተመልከቱ 

Choose your platform iPhone   Android   Roku   Apple TV

                  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.